Domestic Violence Restraining Orders

       
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In California, a Domestic Violence Restraining Order is a way the court can help to prevent repeated acts of violence or sexual abuse in a family, a home, or between people who have a close relationship. The abuse can be by:

  • A spouse or former spouse;
  • People who are dating or used to date (it does not have to be an intimate or sexual relationship);
  • The mother or father of a child;
  • People related to each other by blood, marriage, or adoption (such as a mother, father, child, brother, sister, grandparent, or in-law);
  • A person who regularly lives or used to live in the home. (California Family Code, Section 6211

IMPORTANT NOTE: There are different kinds of restraining orders. If you need protection from someone who is not listed above, you can learn about civil harassment restraining orders by clicking on Judicial Council form CH-150


IF YOU NEED PROTECTION RIGHT NOW, you should CALL 911:

  • a local law enforcement agency,
  • domestic violence shelter, or
  • the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

    If you live in Contra Costa County, California, see Contra Costa County Information  for phone numbers and resources of local social service agencies that my be able to help you.
     

MAKE A SAFETY PLAN  

A safety plan covers steps a person needs to take to keep him- or herself, and his or her children, safe from domestic violence.  Although each safety plan is different, there are some basic questions each person should consider before applying for a Domestic Violence Restraining Order.  To learn more, click here.


If you ask the court for a Domestic Violence Restraining Order, you should be prepared to not see or talk to the person to be restrained. 

If you aren't sure whether you want to end your relationship or get back together with the person you want to be restrained, consider talking with the staff at a domestic violence shelter, a counselor, or an attorney to help you decide.


TO ASK THE COURT FOR A DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RESTRAINING ORDER

 

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