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Juvenile Delinquency

       
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Juvenile Delinquency:

If your child is involved in a juvenile delinquency case that means he or she is accused of breaking the law. The court will consider how old your child is, how serious the crime is, and the child’s criminal record if any.

The court can order that:

  • Your child live with you under court supervision.
  • Your child be put on probation. He or she may have to live with a relative, in a foster home or group home, or in an institution.
  • Your child be put on probation and sent to a probation camp or ranch.
  • Your child can be sent to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice  (also called “DJJ”). If your child is tried in adult court, he or she will be sent to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Adult Operations  (also called “CDCR”).

If your child is sent to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ), he or she will go to a “reception center” for the first 30 to 90 days. The center will find out what education and treatment your child needs. Then your child will go a correctional facility or youth camp.


Parental responsibilities when your child is arrested:

As a parent (or guardian) you have legal responsibilities. You may also have financial responsibilities for any damage caused by your child:

  • You may have to pay the victim if the court orders “restitution.” Restitution is money to compensate for losses or damage caused by your child. For example, you may have to pay for what your child stole, or for the victim’s medical bills or lost wages.
  • You may also have to pay for your child’s lawyer, juvenile hall services (like food and laundry), and fees to keep your child at the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. This can be expensive, so talk to the court about your financial ability to pay for these fees and costs.

You can also ask the probation officer where to get help. You can also get help from your local school district, hospitals, or the mental health department. And it is always a good idea to talk to a lawyer for help.


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